Photos from the field: The Great Western Woodlands.

The Great Western Woodlands (GWW) form the largest tracts of temperate woodlands left on Earth. They hold approximately 30% of Australia’s Eucalypt species, and close to 20% of Australia’s plant species overall. This is truly an overlooked gem of Australian biodiversity. Last Spring I was lucky enough to visit for my work on pollination in our native plants.

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My target there was Eremophila, a genus of approximately 250 species largely confined to arid and semi-arid Australia. The GWW represents one of the centres of diversity for the genus, and so I chose it as a likely spot to set up a new study contrasting bird and insect pollination.

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Eremophila alternifolia was one of about 15 Eremophilas I saw flowering despite the drier than average conditions.

I was joined by perhaps the best kind of field assistant: a trained and accomplished professional ecologist who also happens to be my beautiful wife. After driving 2800km from Melbourne to field sites near Norseman, Western Australia, we spent a little under two weeks observing pollinators, surveying and mapping populations of plants, and collecting samples for population genetics.

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One of the many viewpoints south of the Nullarbor Plain.

I left in awe of the scale of these woodlands, in love with the peace and isolation they offer, and a bit concerned over their insecure future. Fully 60% of the GWW is tenured “unallocated Crown land”, unmanaged and open access. With more visitors, and more appreciation of the value of these vast woodlands, I hope we can find a way to secure more of it into ongoing reserve for future generations.

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The bluebush understory contrasts dramatically with red sand in many areas. Front left is one of my study species Eremophila scoparia.

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The whole region is dotted with salt-pans.

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As predicted from the small, violet flowers, Eremophila scoparia was visited by a host of native bees.

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Eremophila decipiens has characteristic bird-adapted flowers.

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Camera traps being expertly arranged by Samantha. Footage revealed that E. decipiens was being visited by a range of honeyeater species.

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Eremophila calorhabdos

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This spectacular Grevillea hid a massive bloom of flowers underneath it

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The inflorescences are held on stems that grow along the ground underneath the shrub. The very long style with pollen-presenter is suggestive of adaptation to birds, but mammals might not be out of the question.

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Eucalyptus loxophleba with daggy botanist for scale

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Majestic Salmon gum (Eucalyptus salmonophloia) with Samantha for scale.

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The serenity of wandering amongst giant Salmon gums at dusk was magic.

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Gleaming bark on Eucalyptus salubris

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Elevating on Lake Cowan. Photo: S. Vertucci.

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For the second half of the trip I was joined by collaborator and all-round legend Dr. Renee Catullo. I made us walk 10km to collect camp gear following a single poor decision.

Stay tuned as research results emerge. The study should tell us about the way pollen moves under bee and bird pollination, and how those fine scale patterns play out on a grand landscape level.

Photos from the field: Northern Sand-plains, WA

Peaceful woodlands of widely spaced gnarled Eucalypts lie in mosaic with spiny, scratchy, shrubby heath on the sand-plains north of Perth. They form one of the most floristically diverse regions on earth, with estimates of over 60 species of plant per 0.01 ha (an area smaller than half an an IMAX screen).

With so many species packed on top of one another, it is perhaps not surprising that in the effort to co-exist, some plants have been forced to flower outside the traditional Spring-flowering window. Winter in the sand-plains, while often wet and cloudy, is therefore anything but dull. While daily insect activity is very low, resident birds and honey possums must still feed, and so there are a comparatively high number of vertebrate-pollinated species in full flower at this time of year.

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Omphalina chromacea in its diminutive but sulphureous glory

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Bird-pollinated Astroloma glaucenscens excludes insect visitors with a tiny corolla-tube opening

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Pterostylis sanguinea: a sexually-deceptive trap-pollination orchid

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Astroloma stomarrhena, bird-pollinated. This individual has curiously short corolla tubes.

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Calothamnus sanguineus mixed in with Conostephium

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Calothamnus sanguineus

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An early-flowering Caladenia latifolia

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Diuris corymbosa

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Tiny pgymy Drosera

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One of the most common orchids in the area, but I’ve never seen it flower. Pyrorchis leaf.

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Very rare, and while this specimen is a little tired late in the season, the winter-flowering Cleopatra’s Needles (Thelymitra apiculata) is a stunning contrast of hues.

Photos from the field: East Gippsland, Victoria

I recently began a brand new project with the University of Melbourne. The beginning of a new project is filled with equal parts excitement and trepidation—excitement at the novelty, the blank canvas, the potential, and trepidation at not wanting to put a foot wrong in critical early decisions that will affect the outcome of a career-defining opportunity.

Here the photos from a first foray into East Gippsland, surveying sites for bird-pollinated Prostanthera walteri.

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Mt. Elizabeth

 

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Snowy River National Park

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Prostanthera walteri

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Prostanthera hirtula

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McKillops Bridge

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The Snowy River

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The Snowy River

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Prostanthera walteri

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Snowy River National Park

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Gippsland waratah – Telopea oreades

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Floral diversity in Prostanthera

 

The Toadlet Diaries 1: Trench warfare frogging.

In 2010 I was fortunate to accompany herpetologist Dr. Renee Catullo on a trip through Australia’s Top End collecting little brown frogs. Here are some of my field notes along with photography. While my photography has vastly improved, I’m not sure I’ve felt so inspired to write since that trip. I hope this series of vignettes communicate some of the flavour and excitement of the wet season in Australia’s monsoon tropics.

3 February 2010

Birds, wind, insects, all still, all silent. An atmosphere of exhaustion settles in as the temperature draws near 40. Wanda Inn roadhouse sits baking between red clay and the azure expanse of the outback sky. This would be home for the night, and we’d best get some sleep before tonight’s activities.

Littoria caerulea find respite from day's dry heat by hanging out in the toilets.

Littoria caerulea find respite from day’s dry heat by hanging out in the toilets.

The area hadn’t seen rain for a while but on dusk the moodily flashing cumulus clouds in the distance promised a change in the weather. Soon after dark we find ourselves in frogless country, standing on the roof of the Landcruiser captivated by the lightshow of distant electrical storms. As time passes the breeze blows harder, and we drive closer to its origin. Soon we are buffeted by a stiff cool wind, petrichor fills the air, fat drops of rain spatter and we are surrounded on all sides by the intermittent discharge of three kinds of lighting. Coruscating bolts crack somewhere between us and the horizon, leaving their jagged after-image in negative on our retinas, snaking fingers of electrical tracery race bifurcating and branching in the clouds overhead, and distant bolts diffused through cloud and rain suddenly bathe the land in white, turning puddles into mirrors for the silver sky before plunging us back into darkness. The weather is completely in character for the Northern Territory: at once utterly romantic and dangerously thrilling.

We stop periodically to stand on the car and take pictures of the gathering storm (still no frogs calling) but when a blinding bolt cracks too close for comfort we quickly curtail our roof-standing. Discouraged by the lack of frogs, the talk turns to gin and tonic at our next stop, but when we get there, rather than a refreshing drink, the distinctive chip of the Stonemason toadlet greets us and the frogging is on.

And so the wind blows, fat drops spatter our skin as we stride through waist high grass and negotiate ankle-twisting holes, boot-sucking puddles, and mud that cakes to the mud that’s caked on the mud caked on our boots. We wiggle between the slick ground and barbed wire fences while the sky flashes chaotically, rumbling and booming, and we stalk around pools thronging with the disorientating din of burrowing frogs, occasionally glimpsing the wide eyes of the other when the land in an instant becomes awash in the white of a nearby burst of lighting. This was trench-warfare frogging.

Top End storm

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My bruised human ego

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This is the best photo I got of a group of baboons who gave me quite an experience the other day.

On a sandy fynbos trail, I rounded a corner obscured by vegetation and came abruptly face to face with a troupe of seven of these creatures. The closest member was only 3 metres from me. All of them were stopped, standing or sitting,  looking at me as I did the same. My first reaction was one of awe, these creatures are impressively muscular and intimidating up close. One of them, a very large male, was wearing a radio collar. My second instinct was to take advantage of the photo opportunity, but my camera was in my backpack.

My only close experience with monkeys comes from Indonesian macaques, and extrapolating from the damage these ones wreak on tourists’ belongings I was not keen to get the baboons interested in anything I owned. I was also aware that some baboon troupes in the Cape have a reputation for raiding. Bins, bags, picnics, cars, houses are all fair game. They have overcome their fear of humans and are now a famous nuisance requiring full time management.

My bag therefore remained zipped and in place on my back. I raised my arms and hissed, to try and persuade them off the trail. One of the leaders began to advance on me, and the others stood up to follow suit.

Finally, I was forced to concede the path to the baboons. I back-stepped into the bush beside the track, allowing them a 2 metre thoroughfare which they calmly took in an orderly and nonchalant fashion. Only after passing me, when their backs were exposed, did they pick up speed into a quick trot for a dozen metres to put some distance between us.

 

Red Hill fynbos track

Kleinplaas Dam fynbos track